Millennials: Your First Steps Towards Financial Freedom

There are countless headlines circulating in the financial media about millennials poor financial outlook. After reading about the soaring student loan debt, stagnant wage growth, and other issues, it may seem like financial freedom is just a dream that is no longer reachable, but nothing could be further from the truth. As long as you make the right financial moves while youre young, its still 100% possible to turn that dream into a reality.

Dont turn down free money
When youre in your 20s, its understandable that retirement could be the last thing on your mind. However, the early years of your career are by far the most important to your long-term financial health, so its important to get a few major decisions right.

One that is particularly important is making sure you take full advantage of your employers 401(k) match, even if it feels like a stretch to have that money withheld from your paycheck. According to a TIAA-CREF survey, 23% of employees who have the opportunity dont contribute enough to receive the full match.

If you dont get the full amount your employer is willing to match, its like giving away free money. You wouldnt be happy if your salary was cut by say, 4%, but thats exactly what youre doing by turning down the free money thats offered to you. And, keep in mind that the true value of those 401(k) contributions are more than they seem. If youre 25 years old and earn $50,000 per year, a 4% employer match is worth $2,000 per year. Over a 40-year career, those employer contributions alone can balloon into a six-figure nest egg.

VCU brings money management in-house

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AXIOLOGIX INC (OTCMKTS:AXLX) Acquires International Money Management Inc. To …

AXIOLOGIX INC (OTCMKTS:AXLX) signed a definitive agreement to acquire a few assets of International Money Management Inc so that it could build up money transfer portfolio. AXIOLOGIX is one of the leading names in International Remittance and mobile payment space.

The Irvine CA-based International Money Management Inc. can prove to be a major asset for any company trying to make a mark in money transfer field. The transaction was subjected to a few condition, including AXIOLOGIX getting a total funding of $500,000.

Insights of Acquisition

It’s one of the best decisions made by AXIOLOGIX to build up its portfolio in money transfer vertical. All the parties interested in offering required funds to AXIOLOGIX gave their approval right away, which helped the company finish the transaction within a matter of three-four months from the day of the announcement.

IMM is mainly known for marketing a US issued prepaid debit card; that’s affiliated with a foreign debit card, which makes it easy to transfer money to a foreign country without any hassle. There are many people who belong to a foreign country, but work in US With this card, they cannot only transfer the money from one country to another country in a hassle-free way, but also save a significant amount of time and penalty charges.

People having IMM cards can pay their home country utility bills right from US without any interruption. They can also use this card in other overseas locations and make financial transactions.

Both AXIOLOGIX and Money Management Inc. have been conducting different due diligence procedures for a very long period to ensure that everything falls in line. The definitive agreement has been signed after getting good results in due diligence procedure. The agreement didn’t affect the Money Management Inc. management composition as no change was introduced after the execution.

Both of them will keep all the investors updated about any further update in this direction.

The Next Financial Crisis – How Good Rules Go Bad

Karen Shaw Petrou’s Federalist Society speech titled, The Next Financial Crisis How Good Rules Go Bad

It is an honor to speak here today with Senator Gramm, a man whose name graces many of the most important banking and budgetary bills enacted during the decades he represented Texas voters – I know they miss him still. He has just spoken about the macroeconomic risks he believes result from Federal Reserve accommodative-monetary policy. But, there’s an even greater danger than misfiring monetary policy: none at all. The new, radically-different structure of the US financial-services market means that the Fed can’t tell the economy what to do anymore because banks don’t matter anywhere near as much as they used to. You may well say good riddance given the cost of the financial crisis, but a country without a functioning monetary-policy delivery channel where systemic risks increasingly arise outside the reach of prudential regulation is one putting itself at great and unnecessary risk.

Is this alarmist? I sure hope so. I’m not the only one, though, worrying a lot about the FRB’s growing inability to use interest rates and bank reserves to set the economy on its preferred course – a conference held yesterday and today at the Federal Reserve Board itself on precisely this issue shows that the FRB knows it has a problem even though it has yet, sadly, to broach any solutions. The global Financial Stability Board yesterday counted up all the US financial assets housed in most non-banks, logging them in at $14.2 trillion at year-end 2014.1 That’s not small and neither is the risk they pose.

Although describing the conference as a research session, Chair Yellen yesterday said that she would like to better understand how changes in the way US financial intermediation affects monetary-policy transmission. Let me today offer my own thoughts on this critical question and, given how urgent it is, also a few things the FRB can and should do ASAP to save not only its ability to conduct monetary policy, but also the rest of us from preventable systemic crises.

Maybe we could manage without monetary policy if there was another way to short-circuit boom-bust crises – what we’ve come to call macroprudential regulation. But macropru doesn’t work any better than monetary policy. In the real world in which financial institutions live or die, rules have costs and costs have consequences. Regulators believe that costs are manageable and consequences are nothing but beneficial. However, the costs now are so great that combined with other market transformations, they pose significant second-order risks. We’ve probably corrected for all the causes of the last crisis, but I fear we’re sowing the seeds of the next one.

Where Needed Change Still Sows Systemic Seeds

Before I talk about specific regulatory actions and how they have changed the market, let me first point to one example of the best intentions that nonetheless pose grave risk. It epitomizes how even an unimpeachable policy action poses second-order dangers.

The policy actions I mean here aren’t so much a single rule, but rather the cumulative impact of all of the new rules and the current, way-tough enforcement environment. Many of these rules – stress-testing, for example – are essential and punishment for crisis-causing behavior was, if anything, too weak. But in practice the new rules and enforcement regime combine with newly-enhanced risk management and better boards to force banks to devote billions not to innovation and enhanced customer service, but rather to model-building, internal investigations, and new information systems.

Gliniewicz Family Had Financial Issues, Traveled Extensively

The family of Lt. Joe Gliniewicz, the now-disgraced Fox Lake police officer whose “carefully staged suicide” appears to be an attempt to cover up years of criminal activity, was experiencing serious financial problems around the time police allege the officer started an elaborate embezzlement scheme. NBC 5s Tammy Leitner reports. (Published Friday, Nov. 6, 2015)